Table 3: Types of protective gowns for personal protection [7].

Types of gowns

Features

Text Box: Gowns for blood-borne pathogens

Surgical gowns

 

   FDA Class II medical device

   Protect patient and health care personnel from transmitting microorganisms, particulate matter, and body fluids, during surgical procedures

   Critical zones of protection have been described by national standards

   Surgical gowns can be used for any risk level (Levels 1-4)

Surgical isolation gowns

   Used in medium to high risk of contamination and a need for larger critical zones than traditional surgical gowns

   FDA Class II medical device

   All areas except bindings, cuffs, and hems are considered critical zones of protection

   Must meet the highest liquid barrier protection level

Non-Surgical Gowns

 

   FDA Class I devices

   Protect the wearer from transferring microorganisms and body fluids, in low or minimal risk patient isolation situations

   Not for surgical procedures, invasive procedures, or ins a medium to high risk of contamination

   Should cover as much of the body as appropriate for the task

   All areas except bindings, cuffs, and hems are considered critical zones of protection

   Must meet the highest liquid barrier protection level

   All seams must have the same liquid barrier protection as the rest of the gown

Text Box: Gowns for airborne pathogens

 

Coverall gown

   Polyethylene-coated fabric protects against light liquid splash

   Lightweight fabric is durable and resistant to tear and abrasion.

   Zipper provides complete closure

   Not flame-resistant and should not be used around heat, flame, sparks or in potentially flammable or explosive environments.

Nuclear protective

For nuclear workers to protect them from contamination nuclear materials